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Conclusion: The notion that acupuncture is an effective symptomatic treatment for fibromyalgia is not supported by the results from rigorous clinical trials. On the basis of this evidence, acupuncture cannot be recommended for fibromyalgia. Mayhew E, Ernst E. Rheumatology (December 2006)

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The results of this randomised, controlled clinical trial demonstrated that acupuncture provided no greater benefit than invasive sham acupuncture in reducing systolic or diastolic BP (blood pressure). Hypertension (November 2006)

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A three-armed randomized trial. Conclusions: "Compared with physiotherapy and as-needed anti-inflammatory drugs, addition of either TCA (traditional Chinese acupuncture) or sham acupuncture led to greater improvement in WOMAC score at 26 weeks. No statistically significant difference was observed between TCA and sham acupuncture, suggesting that the observed differences could be due to placebo effects, differences in intensity of provider contact, or a physiologic effect of needling regardless of whether it is done according to TCA principles." Annals of Internal Medicine (July 2006)

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Concludes that "acupuncture remains steeped in controversy. Some findings are encouraging but others suggest that its clinical effects mainly depend on a placebo response". E. Ernst, Journal of Internal Medicine (February 2006)

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This trial found no difference between acupuncture and sham acupuncture in the ability of stroke patients to perform daily activities of living or in their health-related quality of life. The study involved 116 patients who received 12 treatment sessions during a 2-week period. Archives of Internal Medicine (September 2005)

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Concludes that although the results of the study on electroacupuncture show that electroacupuncture may be beneficial to reduce symptomatic knee pain in patients with RA 24 hours and 4 months post treatment, the reviewers concluded that the poor quality of the trial, including the small sample size preclude its recommendation. The reviewers further conclude that acupuncture has no effect on ESR, CRP, pain, patient's global assessment, number of swollen joints, number of tender joints, general health, disease activity and reduction of analgesics. (22nd August 2005)

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Conclusions: "The notion that acupuncture may be an effective analgesic adjunctive method for cancer patients is not supported by the data currently available from the majority of rigorous clinical trials. Because of its widespread acceptance, appropriately powered RCTs are needed." European Journal of Pain (August 2005)

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A randomized controlled trial. Concludes that acupuncture was no more effective than sham acupuncture in reducing migraine headaches although both interventions were more effective than a waiting list control. Journal of the American Medical Association (4th May 2005)